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BRITAIN'S ENSLAVEMENT
 
 




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Britain's enslavement

Tacitus explains the policy of his father-in-law, Agricola, in bringing the comforts of Roman civilization to the barbarous British:

'His object was to accustom them to a life of peace and quiet by the provision of amenities. He therefore gave official assistance to the building of temples, public squares and good houses. He educated the sons of the chiefs in the liberal arts, and expressed a preference for British ability as compared to the trained skills of the Gauls. The result was that instead of loathing the Latin language they became eager to speak it effectively. In the same way, our national dress came into favour and the toga was everywhere to be seen. And so the population was gradually led into the demoralizing temptation of arcades, baths and sumptuous banquets. The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilization', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement.'

Tacitus Agricola chapter 21, translated by H. Mattingly, Penguin 1948, 1973
 








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