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ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BRITAIN
 
  More than 5000 entries on the history, culture and life of Britain (published in 1993 by Macmillan, now out of print)

 
More than 5000 entries on the history, culture and life of Britain (published in 1993 by Macmillan, now out of print)
Proms

Promenade concerts, originally with the audience walking about, have been held at various times in London since 1838. The term is now used of an unbroken series, still continuing, which was launched by Henry *Wood in 1895. These are too crowded for perambulation, but a large part of the audience stands. Since 1927 the Proms have been sponsored and broadcast by the BBC. They were held in the Queen's Hall until it was bombed in World War II; since 1941 they have been in the *Albert Hall, where the eight-week season (July–Sept.) offers an astonishing wealth of musical performance. Wood died in 1944 and was succeeded by Malcolm *Sargent (until his own death in 1967). Since then there has been no principal conductor.
 






On the last night of the Proms the orchestra is invariably the BBC Symphony Orchestra. The occasion is a traditional one of jingoistic jollity, with much flag-waving from the promenaders who join in the choruses of three final works, now an inseparable part of the occasion: Land of Hope and Glory, deriving from the first of Elgar's *Pomp and Circumstance marches; Henry Wood's *Fantasia on British Sea Songs, which includes Rule, Britannia!; and Parry's *Jerusalem.
 








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